• Instructor: Benjamin Soltoff, Lecturer in Computational Social Science
  • Teaching Assistant: Joshua Mausolf
  • Meeting day/time: MW 1:30-2:50pm (Saieh Hall of Economics 247)
  • Online course discussion: GitHub discussion repo
  • Open lab session: M 4:30-5:20pm (Saieh Hall of Economics 247)
  • Office hours: Th 2-4pm (Saieh Hall of Economics 249)
  • TA office hours: Tu 3:00-4:30pm (Saieh Hall of Economics 248)
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Requirements: Bring your own laptop

Course Description

This is a for-credit, applied course for social scientists with little-to-no programming experience who wish to harness growing digital and computational resources. The focus of the course is on developing a computational framework which students can implement in their own research. Major emphasis is placed on a pragmatic understanding of programming languages and software libraries. Students will leave the course with basic computational skills in a wide variety of techniques and languages; while students will not become expert programmers, they will gain the knowledge of how to adapt and expand these skills as they are presented with new questions and data.

From The Rise of Partisanship in the U.S. House of Representatives. The authors use network visualizations to depict ideological polarization over time.

From The Rise of Partisanship in the U.S. House of Representatives. The authors use network visualizations to depict ideological polarization over time.

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, students will:

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